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     3 years ago at the World Assembly of the Christian Life Communities in Lebanon there were discussions about the increasing global issue of refugee and migration crisis. At the time in Lebanon, there was approximately 25% of all the inhabitants - refugees, mainly from Syria. Father General Nicholas Adolfo SJ, which is both general of the Jesuit order and ecclesial assistant, has underlined the necessity for CLC to address the issues of migration and refugees in our ministry.

Interview in english

The issue of migrant divides Europe between welcoming countries and those who believe that this will create problems and then reduce the number of entries. The big problem comes from countries who wnat no migrant at all.

Migrant is a general term which includes asylum seekers, and those looking to improve their livelihood, especially from refugee camps.

There is no unanimity in Europe on how to deal with migrants, even the bishops are very cautious in their statements: they say that one must welcome because we are Christians, but they will not support such a policy for their country. COMECE had to remove two articles criticizing the policy of the Central European countries.

   1. Background

                The immigration into Europe had its peak in the middle of last year.  Although it was not without antecedents, it affected the people of Europe and the EU institutions unexpectedly.  On the surface, migration is an issue of public measures to be taken against aliens.  For Christians, it is first of all a humanitarian issue, or rather a question of good conscience.

                From a historical perspective, migration means demographics movements that can be considered quite typical.  It is still a challenge for the modern Europe because, not to mention the emigration into North America, migration cannot be seen as normal, following the industrial revolution that has entailed urbanisation, and offered people to settle down as the subjects of the nation states.

            A note recently made by P. Vértesaljai László, S.J. is addressed to all of us who are affected by the fate of the immigrants massively arriving at Europe: “we should not adjudge them, based on what they do, or what they omit to do, but based on what they suffer from“ (Radio Vaticano).  First we can grasp warning that we should not evaluate the deed of those who come to us in a utilitarian way.  It does not matter what are the consequences of what they do, or how much they are successful.  It is more momentous to realise the intention that works in their heart.  We cannot admit to have moral assessment unless we correlate the deed of our fellow creature to their duties. 

The Phenomenon of Migration as a Special Female Matter

A Responsibility for all European Citizens

The first symposium took place in Celje / Sloveniain January 2008 and assembled 35
participants from 14 European countries. The themeconsidered and debated was “The
Struggle for Gender Equality in Europe – a Story of Success and Ignorance”.
Sincemigration has become a crucial question for all European countries, no matter
whether they favour or fight this fact, whether they call it a blessing or a curse, or regard it as
something normal, every citizen gets confronted with it and is involved in some way. This is
why all federations and friends all over Europe were invited to take part in this second
symposium organized in Cluj / Romania in July 2010
.

Cluj 2-4 July 2010  Click here to download the .pdf file